​​European Youth Network for Creativity and Innovation

EYNCRIN

Leading Innovation in Arts and Culture

The Center seeks to help young arts and culture leaders create an environment where new ideas are constantly created, shared, evaluated and the best ones are successfully put to work.

One of the toughest challenges for any young arts leader is getting traction for new ideas. Winning support can be a struggle. As a result, powerful new ideas often get stuck. This is especially true in the cultural sector. Young people involved in arts and culture often have little time and even less money for experimentation and risks. This Center seeks to develop responses to help those in the performing arts, museums, zoos, libraries and other cultural organizations build environments where new management and program ideas are created, shared, evaluated and the best ones are successfully put to work.

Our "Leading Innovation in Arts & Culture" program trains art teams how to make an "innovation strategy" a fundamental component of their organization's overall strategy:

  • Analyze constraints on innovation in your organization, foresee obstacles and opportunities, and develop a shared vision
  • Develop a process to manage the demands of multiple stakeholders, shifting priorities and the uncertainty inherent in new initiatives
  • Create a culture for innovation and risk-taking that generates new perspectives and challenges existing practice
  • Create a strong customer focus within your organization that anticipates customer needsArts education is often said to be a means of developing critical and creative thinking.


Arts education has also been argued to enhance performance in non-arts academic subjects such as mathematics, science, reading and writing, and to strengthen students’ academic motivation, self-confidence, and ability to communicate and co-operate effectively.


Arts education thus seems to have a positive impact on the three subsets of skills that we define as "skills for innovation": subject-based skills, including in non-arts subjects; skills in thinking and creativity; and behavioural and social skills.

The impact of arts education on other non-arts skills and on innovation in the labour market should not be the primary justification for arts education in today’s curricula. The arts have been in existence since the earliest humans, are parts of all cultures, and are a major domain of human experience, just like science, technology, mathematics, and humanities.


The arts are important in their own rights for education. Students who gain mastery in an art form may discover their life’s work or their life’s passion. But for all children and young people, the arts allow a different way of understanding than the sciences. Because they are an arena without right and wrong answers, they free students to explore and experiment. They are also a place to introspect and find personal meaning.


CICAC promotes KNOWLEDGE SHARING, networking and financial independence for individual artists and creative entrepreneurs by providing business training, grants and INCUBATING INNOVATIVE PROJECTS that create new program knowledge, tools and practices for artists in the field.